Sat. Sep 24th, 2022
An artistic approach to an Xbox Live player that transcends boundaries, as identified by Microsoft this week on a new Xbox Community Standards page.
enlarge An artistic approach to an Xbox Live player that transcends boundaries, as identified by Microsoft this week on a new Xbox Community Standards page.

Getty Images / Sam Machkovech

An apparently new page on the official Xbox website called “Community Standards for Xbox” was recently unearthed by members of the ResetEra gaming forums. The page appears to be the first of its kind from an online console gaming provider, as it translates the legal language of Microsoft’s existing “service agreement” into direct “l33t” speech.

The page, which has yet to receive signal boost from Xbox reps like Phil Spencer or Larry “Major Nelson” Hyrb, goes into detail about 10 key points in Microsoft’s Services Agreement — the form you need to scroll through and click “accept.” click when creating an Xbox or Microsoft account. These 10 points have been reformulated slightly to better represent an Xbox usage scenario and are followed by examples of hypothetical activities, including smack talk.

Perhaps the most notable section is the “keep your content clean” category. Microsoft’s official agreement describes this as follows:

Not publicly display or use the Services to share inappropriate content or material (for example, involving nudity, bestiality, pornography, offensive language, graphic violence, or criminal activity).

The Xbox Community Standards page breaks this down into a few more discreetly defined categories, and one of them is titled, “know the difference between trashtalk and harassment.” It includes an acknowledgment that “a little trash talk is an expected part of competitive multiplayer action,” then clarifies that “hate has no place here.”

A dictionary-style description of harassment provides examples such as “negative behavior that is personalized, disruptive, or likely to make someone feel unwelcome or unsafe” and is written in an “inclusive but not limited to” manner. The default page then offers five examples of acceptable in-game trash talk, each seemingly plucked from a popular online gaming genre like FPS and racing, and later each tweaked to an unacceptable version.

The nice list:

  • Get destroyed. I can’t believe you thought you were on my level.
  • That was a serious potato target. Will be demolished.
  • The only reason you got positive was that you camped the entire game. Try again, boy.
  • Cheap win. Come to me if you can actually drive without taking cars off the road.
  • That was stupid. Get good and then come back when your k/d is greater than 1.

And the naughty list:

  • Get † I can’t believe you thought you were on my level.
  • Hey , that was a serious potato target. Get demolished, trash.
  • The only reason you got positive was that you camped the entire game. KYS, boy.
  • Cheap win. Total expected from a
  • You suck. Get out of my country – maybe they’ll let you back in if your k/d is over 1.

(Before you start fragging the messenger — yes, yes, we know, “get stretch” is the standard online spelling of that phrase.)

No more loot caves?!

Since the document is quite long, we’re not going to list it beat-by-beat, except to point out a few salient points in the document. They may not seem so new to TOS veterans, but Xbox has listed them a little more discreetly in this document.

A section on “harmful behavior” goes into detail about cheats and exploits. But it also includes a warning against “using ‘mods’ not explicitly supported by a game developer,” which is a broad network that can include actions such as unlocking keyboard-and-mouse support in an Xbox game that does not formally support it and “use exploits to ‘duplicate’ in-game items”, which many players might consider no more than taking advantage of a developer’s bug code to take advantage of PvE benefits such as lot 1′s famous ‘loot cave’.

A “fraud” section explicitly prohibits “asking another player to help them complete a level in a game”, which could break the work of “online companion” services that provide such paid pro-gamer assistance. Meanwhile, the “keep your content clean” section includes a request to players not to “use your activity feed as a platform to promote controversial politics,” which could lead to trolls posting massively about women, people of color, or the LGBTQ community. .

The document ends with a reminder of what happens to accounts with repeated violations: “In case of permanent suspension, the owner of the suspended profile will lose all licenses for games and other content, Gold membership time, and Microsoft account balances.” This kind of suspension doesn’t seem to restrict access to Xbox’s disc-based games.

Update: Shortly after this article went live, a Microsoft representative issued the following statement to Ars Technica: “Community Standards for Xbox, which launched on April 30, make it easier to understand what kind of behavior is acceptable on Xbox Live and what isn’t. , and how you can positively contribute to the global Xbox community to ensure it is safe, welcoming and inclusive for everyone.The standards are not a new set of rules, but are a call to action that empowers every player evaluate their behavior and adjust accordingly in order to be a force for the better.”

By akfire1

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